A Chicago Tribune editorial tells a hard truth to its readers: Foxconn chose Wisconsin because it is not Illinois.

Foxconn Chairman Terry Gou gave an interview to Steve Jagler, the business editor of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Gou gave Jagler eight reasons why Foxconn chose Wisconsin. Two of them were — literally — proximity to Illinois: First, Wisconsin is conveniently located in the central U.S., “close to Chicago, a global hub,” the Journal Sentinel reported. Second, Wisconsin has the transportation and logistics to accommodate Foxconn’s growth, and is … near O’Hare International Airport. Feel free to smack your forehead.

Now play along as we study more of Foxconn’s list of Wisconsin attributes to see how many also match Illinois. A manufacturing mecca? Yes, that’s Illinois, too. Strong university and technical college systems? Yes. Energy reliability? Yes. Proximity to Lake Michigan water supply? Well, duh. Foxconn also likes Wisconsin because it’s home to allied companies such as Rockwell Automation, but Illinois is just a quick drive south.

The final reason Foxconn picked Wisconsin over Illinois is the difference-maker: government cooperation and competence. The Journal Sentinel wrote that Gou believed “the responsiveness of the public and private partners in Wisconsin far exceeded those of other states.” Gou singled out the cooperation of Gov. Scott Walker, U.S. House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., and local business groups: “These key people pushed very hard.”

In other words, Foxconn liked everything about Illinois, but Wisconsin officials convinced Gou they made the best business partners. How could that be? Wisconsin will provide $3 billion in tax benefits over 15 years, but incentives are the norm and Illinois, one of seven finalists, was willing to offer some. National politics could have been a factor, given that Foxconn would benefit from pleasing President Donald Trump, who hopes to win Wisconsin again in 2020. But companies don’t make huge investment decisions just to make a president smile.

Here’s the takeaway: Foxconn chose the state that has stable government, healthy finances and pro-growth policies for employers. Illinois has none of the above.

Wisconsin’s economic policies received another vote of confidence Friday. Moody’s Investor Service, the credit rating reporting company, upgraded the status of Wisconsin’s General Obligation rating to Aa1, up from Aa2. It was the first improvement in Wisconsin’s credit rating since 1973, according to a release from the Walker Administration. Illinois’ credit rating is the lowest in the country and was in danger of having junk bond status.