I, for one, have little idea how to interpret the new Foxconn news. The press releases from opposing partisan benches offer little help.

The lesson I try to keep in mind recalls the immediate reaction — almost all of it wrong — regarding the March for Life incident involving students from a Catholic high school in Kentucky.  

Trying to keep an open mind, it will be helpful to read factual analyses that one hopes will be forthcoming from public sources such as the Legislative Fiscal Bureau and private researchers at the Wisconsin Policy Forum.

It is entirely possible, as Democrats today gleefully proclaim, that Wisconsin was snared by a gigantic bait and switch.  The most substantive support I have seen for that position is a statement attributed to Foxconn that the market has dramatically switched in the last 18 months. Really? All of a sudden it makes no sense to manufacture here what they said they would make?

Alternatively, the structure of the state’s contract with Foxconn might mean that both the benefits to the state and its costs are proportionally lessened. This will be true if the pledges were correct that the bulk of taxpayer subsidies were/are linked to tangible results.

I would have voted for the Foxconn “deal.” I considered it a risky big bet that was worth taking. I am prepared, once more facts are available, to acknowledge an error in judgment. Or, the truth might support a view that the potential of Foxconn still is a net benefit for Wisconsin. We don’t know enough yet to decide.